Author(s): Lata Choudhary, Ritesh Jain, Satish Sahu

Email(s): drsksahu11@gmail.com

DOI: 10.52711/0974-360X.2024.00225   

Address: Lata Choudhary1, Ritesh Jain2, Satish Sahu3*
1Department of Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy, Chouksey Engineering College, NH-49, Masturi - Jairamnagar Road, Lalkhadan, Bilaspur 495004, Chhattisgarh.
2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Chouksey College of Engineering, NH-49, Masturi - Jairamnagar Road, Lalkhadan, Bilaspur 495004, Chhattisgarh.
3Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Chouksey Engineering College, NH-49, Masturi - Jairamnagar Road, Lalkhadan, Bilaspur 495004, Chhattisgarh.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 17,      Issue - 3,     Year - 2024


ABSTRACT:
Mango ginger, or Curcuma amada Roxb., is an uncommon spice that looks like ginger but flavors like fresh mango. Pickles and other culinary items are typically made with mango ginger rhizomes. Mango ginger is widely regarded in Ayurvedic and Unani medicinal systems as a digestive aid, aphrodisiac, antipyretic, emollient, diuretic, laxative, and expectorant as well as a cure for biliousness, itching, skin disorders, bronchitis, asthma, hiccups, and inflammation caused by accidents. Aside from its numerous biological benefits, mango ginger has antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, cytotoxic, anti-allergic, hypotriglyceridemic, CNS depressing properties, analgesic, etc. Some of the major chemical constituents are volatile oils, phenolic acids, curcuminoids, starch, terpenoids, etc. The primary active components of C. amada are highlighted in this review article along with their biological roles, which may be important from a pharmacological standpoint.


Cite this article:
Lata Choudhary, Ritesh Jain, Satish Sahu. Mango Ginger – Curcuma amada – The Uncommon Spice with Uncommon Pharmacotherapeutic Potentials. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2024; 17(3):1418-4. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2024.00225

Cite(Electronic):
Lata Choudhary, Ritesh Jain, Satish Sahu. Mango Ginger – Curcuma amada – The Uncommon Spice with Uncommon Pharmacotherapeutic Potentials. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2024; 17(3):1418-4. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2024.00225   Available on: https://rjptonline.org/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2024-17-3-76


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