Author(s): Artono, Sukma Nisa Janitra, Nyilo Purnami, Edi Handoko, Agung Dwi Wahyu Widodo, Juniastuti

Email(s): nyilo@fk.unair.ac.id

DOI: 10.52711/0974-360X.2023.00677   

Address: Artono1, Sukma Nisa Janitra2, Nyilo Purnami2, Edi Handoko3, Agung Dwi Wahyu Widodo4, Juniastuti4
1Doctoral Program, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya Indonesia.
2Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Airlangga/Dr Soetomo General Hospital, Surabaya Indonesia.
3Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Brawijaya, Malang, Indonesia.
4Department of Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Airlangga, Dr Soetomo General Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 16,      Issue - 9,     Year - 2023


ABSTRACT:
Background: Forming biofilms on bacteria can inhibit the penetration of antimicrobial agents and avoid the immune defence system. It becomes one of the factors causing therapy failure and chronicity of infection. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common bacteria found in Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM), which has the virulence ability to form biofilm structures. Some studies have reported that acetic acid can inhibit and eradicate biofilm complexes and is thought to be an alternative to additional therapy against bacterial infections that form biofilms. Objective: to explain the effect of acetic acid inhibiting and eradicating Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm in CSOM. Methods: This study used an experimental in vitro laboratory with a post-test-only control group method. Samples were taken from the secretions of the mastoid cavity of CSOM patients. The inhibitory effect of acetic acid was observed by administering acetic acid to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In contrast, the effect of eradicating biofilm was observed by administering acetic acid to Pseudomonas aeruginosa which had already formed a biofilm. The observations in this study were using the microtiter plate assay method and were measured with an ELISA reader. Data analysis used the One-Way Anova test and multiple comparisons (Tukey HSD Test). Result: The inhibitory effect of acetic acid on the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm was obtained (p=0.000) with significant results (p <0.05) between the positive control group and the concentration group of 0.16%, 0.31%, 0.63%, 1.25%, 2.5%, and 5%. The Minimum Biofilm Inhibitory Concentration (MIBC) value of acetic acid in forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms was 0.16%. The effect of acetic acid eradication on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms (p=0.000) with significant results (p<0.05) between the positive control group and the concentration group of 0.08%, 0.16%, 0.31%, 0.63%, 1.25%, 2.5%, and 5%. While the minimum value of acetic acid Biofilm Eradication Concentration (MEBC) for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm eradication was 0.08%. Conclusion: Acetic acid inhibits the formation and eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in CSOM.


Cite this article:
Artono, Sukma Nisa Janitra, Nyilo Purnami, Edi Handoko, Agung Dwi Wahyu Widodo, Juniastuti. Effect of Acetic Acid on Clinical Isolated Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm in Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media: In vitro Study. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology 2023; 16(9):4138-2. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2023.00677

Cite(Electronic):
Artono, Sukma Nisa Janitra, Nyilo Purnami, Edi Handoko, Agung Dwi Wahyu Widodo, Juniastuti. Effect of Acetic Acid on Clinical Isolated Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm in Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media: In vitro Study. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology 2023; 16(9):4138-2. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2023.00677   Available on: https://rjptonline.org/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2023-16-9-21


REFERENCES
1.    Kannan A, Gautam P. A quantitative study on the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. Springerplus. 2015;4:1–3.
2.    Balfas H. Peradangan Telinga Tengah. Jakarta: Penerbit buku kedokteran EGC; 2018. 64–75 p.
3.    Mansoor T, MA M, G K, M. K. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chronic suppurative otitis media: sensitivity spectrum against various antibiotics in Karachi. J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad. 2009;21:120–3.
4.    SK L, MS L, SY J, JY B, MS P, SG Y. Antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from otorrhea of chronic suppurative otitis media patients. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2010;143:500–5.
5.    Umar JB, Ibrahim MM, Tom IM, Umoru AM, Isa T. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in otitis media. Int J Med. 2016;4:55.
6.    Artono, Surayya R, Purnami N, Handoko E. Microbiological profile with Antibiotic Sensitivity Pattern for Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media in A Tertiary Hospital, Indonesia. Res J Pharm Technol. 2022;15:1683–8.
7.    Mansour S, Magnan J, Nicolas K, Haidar H. Middle Ear Diseases. Switzerland: Springer International Publishing; 2018. 220–230 p.
8.    Saleh AA, Tektook NK, Rasheed IAAM. Interleukins levels associated with Chronic Otitis Media (CSOM). Res J Pharm Tech. 2019;12:5801–4.
9.    Lee MR, Pawlowski KS, Luong A, Furze AD, Roland PS. Biofilm presence in humans with chronic suppurative otitis media. Otolaryngol neck Surg  Off J Am Acad  Otolaryngol Neck Surg. 2009;141:567–71.
10.    Saunders J, Murray M, Alleman A. Biofilms in chronic suppurative otitis media and cholesteatoma: Scanning electron microscopy findings. Am J Otolaryngol - Head Neck Med Surg. 2011;32:32–7.
11.    Suprihati B. Hubungan Biofilm dan Resistensi Bakteri dengan Respon Klinis Terapi Antibiotik Topikal pada Otitis Media Supuratif Kronis Benigna. Medica Hosp  J Clin Med. 2016;3.
12.    Artono A, Purnami N, Rahmawati R. Biofilm bacteria plays a role in csom pathogenesis and has significant correlation with unsafe type CSOM. Folia Medica Indones. 2015;51:208–13.
13.    Ryssel H, Kloeters O, Germann G, Schafer T, Wiedemann G, Ohelbauer M. The antimicrobial effect of acetic acid — An alternative to common local antiseptics. Burns. 2009;35:695–700.
14.    Abdelghafar A, Yousef N, Askoura M. Combating Staphylococcus aureus biofilm with Antibiofilm agents as an efficient strategy to control bacterial infection. Res J Pharm Technol. 2020;13:5601–6.
15.    Bjarnsholt T, Alhede M, Jensen PØ, Nielsen AK, Johansen HK, Homøe P, et al. Antibiofilm Properties of Acetic Acid. Wound Heal Soc. 2014;00:1–10.
16.    Halstead FD, Rauf M, Moiemen NS, Bamford A, Wearn CM, Fraise AP, et al. The antibacterial activity of acetic acid against biofilm-producing pathogens of relevance to burns patients. PLoS One. 2015;10:1–15.
17.    Kahlon RS. Pseudomonas: Molecular and applied biology. Pseudomonas: Molecular and Applied Biology. 2016. 1–518 p.
18.    Artono, Surayya R, Purnami N, Handoko E. Microbiological profile with antibiotic sensitivity pattern for chronic suppurative otitis media in a tertiary hospital in Indonesia. J INDIA. 2020;4:1–9.
19.    Abozed MF, El Latif HKA, Serry FM, El Sayed LM. Correlating Neonates’ Bacterial Isolates with Surrounding Environment in NICU and Detection of Biofilm Formation. Res J Pharm Technol. 2013;6:794–801.
20.    Ghosh R, Das A, Mallik S. Inhibition of Quorum Sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A review. Indian J Pharm Sci. 2019;81:797–806.
21.    Roychoudhury A. Bioactive Quorum Quenchers Antagonizing Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Biofilm. 2020;4:29–45.
22.    Tawre MS, Kamble EE, Kumkar SN, Mulani MS, Pardesi KR. Antibiofilm and antipersister activity of acetic acid against extensively drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAW1. PLoS One. 2021;16:1–16.
23.    Nair DU, Saraswathy MP, Kishore N, Pully NR. Phytochemical and Antimicrobial Evaluation of Luffa cylindrica Linn. Leaf and Flower Extracts–An In-Vitro Study. Res J Pharm Technol. 2010;3:438–41.
24.    Ningrum AG, Frety EE, Diah I, Shabran ZH, Setiani RE, Dewi ER. Antioxidant Activity of Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) Leaf Extract on the Levels of Ovarian Oxidative Stress and Reproductive Hormone in Rattus norvegicus Exposed to Cigarette Smoke. Open Access Maced J Med Sci. 2021;9:1535–40.
25.    Munifah AP, Perdana RF, Juniati SH, Yusuf M, Dewi ER. The profile of laryngopharyngeal reflux patients at Dr. Soetomo teaching hospital, Surabaya Indonesia. Indian J Forensic Med Toxicol. 2020;14:4161.
26.    Kundukad B, Schussman M, Yang K, Seviour T, Yang L, Rice SA, et al. Mechanistic action of weak acid drugs on biofilms. Sci Rep. 2017;7:1–12.
27.    Upgade A, Prabhakaran P. Screening of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients using Methanolic Leaf Extract of C. papaya L. against Hospital Acquired MDR Uropathogens. Res J Pharm Technol. 2015;8:27–30.
28.    Frety EE, Soehato S, Sujuti H, Dewi ER. Effect of Oral Applied Lead Acetate on the Expression of Caspase-3 on Antral Granulosa Cells and Histopathology of Ovary in Female Wistar Rat (Rattus Norvegicus) Ovaries. Res J Pharm Technol. 2021;14:6007–11.
29.    Warnecke T, Gill RT. Organic acid toxicity, tolerance, and production in Escherichia coli biorefining applications. Microb Cell Fact. 2005;4.
30.    Hashim ZS, Baldawi MH, Qader AMA, Mahmood TA. Otomicroscopic and audiological finding in chronic suppurative otitis Media, Baghdad Iraq. Res J Pharm Technol. 2020;13:5885–8.
31.    Mahapatra AK, Swain RP, Revathi B, Nirisha N, Murthy PN. Orodispersible tablets: a review on formulation development technologies and strategies. Res J Pharm Technol. 2013;6:941–53.
32.    Ryssel H, Kloeters O, Germann G, Schäfer T, Wiedemann G, Oehlbauer M. The antimicrobial effect of acetic acid-An alternative to common local antiseptics? Burns. 2009;35:695–700.

Recomonded Articles:

Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology (RJPT) is an international, peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary journal.... Read more >>>

RNI: CHHENG00387/33/1/2008-TC                     
DOI: 10.5958/0974-360X 

1.3
2021CiteScore
 
56th percentile
Powered by  Scopus


SCImago Journal & Country Rank


Recent Articles




Tags


Not Available