Author(s): Sheila Menon, Vidya Bhagat

Email(s): menonsheila@yahoo.com

DOI: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00727   

Address: Sheila Menon1, Vidya Bhagat2
1London College of Clinical Hypnosis Asia, LCCH Asia, 807 Block B Phileo Damansara1, Jalan Damansara, Section 16/11 Petaling Jaya Selangor 46350 Malaysia.
2A.J. Institute of Hospital Management, Mangalore Rajeev Gandhi University, Mangalore 2, India.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 15,      Issue - 9,     Year - 2022


ABSTRACT:
Introduction: Integrative clinical hypnotherapy is an intervention that utilises naturally occurring trance states as the basis for a therapeutic approach that helps patients or clients to overcome their problems in a caring and compassionate way. Purpose: The aim of the current study is to explore the scientific evidence supporting the increased use of compassion and hypnotherapy as an intervention for psychophysiology-related problems. Methodology: This study is a qualitative study, collecting secondary data from the literature in order to provide a descriptive analysis of the evidence supporting the current trend toward the integration of compassion and hypnotherapy as an effective clinical intervention. The study engine proceeded with scoping 50 articles from the previous literature studies using electronic databases such as PubMed, psych-INFO, NCBI, and CINAH from 2010 to 2022 and collected various literature related to the study theme for its investigation. Results and implications: The study provides insights into the benefits of compassionate and integrative hypnotherapy in clinical intervention and intellectualises its current position in terms of scientific parameters and clinical intervention strength. Conclusion: The study brings new insights supporting the scientific evidence of a compassionate and integrative approach to clinical hypnotherapy which offers a newer science-based understanding of the way hypnosis affects the brain and thought processes. The study puts forward models for improved treatment outcomes that address the emotional or cognitive distress which is implacable in clinical intervention.


Cite this article:
Sheila Menon, Vidya Bhagat. The Role of Integrative Clinical Hypnotherapy Interventions and their Place in Modern Medical and Psychological Treatment: A Review Study. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2022; 15(9):4333-0. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00727

Cite(Electronic):
Sheila Menon, Vidya Bhagat. The Role of Integrative Clinical Hypnotherapy Interventions and their Place in Modern Medical and Psychological Treatment: A Review Study. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2022; 15(9):4333-0. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00727   Available on: https://rjptonline.org/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2022-15-9-87


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