Author(s): Sukunta Muadthong, Nusaraporn Kessomboon

Email(s): nusatati@gmail.com

DOI: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00320   

Address: Sukunta Muadthong1, Nusaraporn Kessomboon2*
1Sirindhorn College of Public Health Khon Kaen, Faculty of Public Health and Allied Health Sciences, Royal Institute Office of the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand-40000.
2Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand-40002.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 15,      Issue - 5,     Year - 2022


ABSTRACT:
Purpose: The alcohol brief intervention (ABI) service provided by community pharmacists was not conducted in Thailand. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) is a widely accepted approach to elicit stated preferences in the health economics. This study aims to identify important attributes and levels from both client and community pharmacists' points of view. The step involved in conducting a DCE is to develop the attributes and levels for the model. Attributes relevant to a new community pharmacy-based ABI service were used to determine clients' preferences for receiving this service by a DCE. Methods: The method includes five steps: 1) literature review and researcher observation, 2) raw data collection, 3) attribute selection, 4) attributes and wording confirmation, and 5) researchers' conclusions These steps involved a semi-structured interview given to 20 clients. After conducting the interviews, the data was triangulated to obtain one DCE choice from each client. An iterative constant comparative approach during the data collection and analysis. The selected attribute was derived from a focus group discussion among seven community pharmacists. Results: The five steps resulted in five attributes: modes of consultation, screening methods, a continuation of a conversation, a counseling session, and cost of service. According to the methodological triangulation, eight of ten key informants have opinions congruous with one DCE choice set. Conclusion: The attributes and levels of a Thai community pharmacy-based service for a DCE were derived from both client and community pharmacists' views using five steps. The attributes and levels were suitably used in a subsequent DCE.


Cite this article:
Sukunta Muadthong, Nusaraporn Kessomboon. Attributes for Discrete Choice Experiment on Pharmacy-based Alcohol Brief Intervention Service in Thailand. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2022; 15(5):1924-2. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00320

Cite(Electronic):
Sukunta Muadthong, Nusaraporn Kessomboon. Attributes for Discrete Choice Experiment on Pharmacy-based Alcohol Brief Intervention Service in Thailand. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2022; 15(5):1924-2. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00320   Available on: https://rjptonline.org/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2022-15-5-2


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