Author(s): Nur Yanti Hariana Bt. Othman, Naresh Bhaskar Raj, Naing NN, Mahadeva Rao US, Enie Akhtar, Lee Wan Zhen, Anuar Md Zain

Email(s): bnaresh@unisza.edu.my

DOI: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00308   

Address: Nur Yanti Hariana Bt. Othman1,2, Naresh Bhaskar Raj3*, Naing NN4, Mahadeva Rao US5, Enie Akhtar6, Lee Wan Zhen7, Anuar Md Zain8
1Senior Physiotherapist, Women Health Unit, Hospital Raja Perempuan Zainab II, 15586 Kota Bharu, Kelantan.
2Post graduate student, Faculty of Health Science, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA), 21300 Terengganu, Malaysia.
3Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Health Science, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA), 21300 Terengganu, Malaysia.
4Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA), Terengganu, Malaysia.
5Professor, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA), Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia.
6Obstetric and Gynaecology Specialist and Urogynaecology Specialist, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hospital Raja Perempuan Zainab II, 15586 Kota Bharu, Kelantan.
7Lecturer, Faculty of Health Science, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA), 21300 Terengganu, Malaysia.
8Senior Lecturer,

Published In:   Volume - 15,      Issue - 4,     Year - 2022


ABSTRACT:
Various interventions are available for preventing and treating urinary incontinence, including medication, medical devices, and surgery. Some of the patients are not keen on surgical intervention, and pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) will be another treatment option for female urinary incontinence. The current research aims to assess the effect of pelvic floor muscle training with biofeedback on improving the strength of the pelvic floor muscle, the severity of SUI, and quality of life among females with stress urinary incontinence. A random sampling of 10 patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) referred to the physiotherapy department by urogynecology department, Hospital Raja Perempuan Zainab II (HRPZ II), were recruited into the study of PFMT with biofeedback after a baseline assessment of the severity of stress urinary incontinence, strength, and quality of life. They were evaluated at baseline, at the 4th week, the 8th week of intervention, and a follow-up was done at the 12th week. The outcomes were measured with the incontinence severity index, perineometer, and incontinence impact questionnaire—Short Form IIQ-7. The results showed that there was a significant difference in mean SUI severity (F = 37.81, p= 0.001), strength (F = 15.44, p = 0.002), and quality of life (F = 104.11, p = 0.001) based on time. As a conclusion, pelvic floor muscle training with biofeedback is an assistive device that has significant effectiveness in the conservative treatment of stress urinary incontinence in female patients.


Cite this article:
Nur Yanti Hariana Bt. Othman, Naresh Bhaskar Raj, Naing NN, Mahadeva Rao US, Enie Akhtar, Lee Wan Zhen, Anuar Md Zain. Effect of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training with Biofeedback on Stress Urinary Incontinence in Females, Kelantan, Malaysia: A pilot study. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2022; 15(4):1831-6. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00308

Cite(Electronic):
Nur Yanti Hariana Bt. Othman, Naresh Bhaskar Raj, Naing NN, Mahadeva Rao US, Enie Akhtar, Lee Wan Zhen, Anuar Md Zain. Effect of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training with Biofeedback on Stress Urinary Incontinence in Females, Kelantan, Malaysia: A pilot study. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2022; 15(4):1831-6. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00308   Available on: https://rjptonline.org/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2022-15-4-74


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