Author(s): Bykov Vladimir Valer’evich, Bykova Arina Vladimirovna, Leonov Klim Andreevich, Vengerovskii Alexander Isaakovich, Udut Vladimir Vasil’evich

Email(s): vladimir.b.1989@gmail.com

DOI: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00207   

Address: Bykov Vladimir Valer’evich1*, Bykova Arina Vladimirovna1,2, Leonov Klim Andreevich1, Vengerovskii Alexander Isaakovich2, Udut Vladimir Vasil’evich3
1Innovative Pharmacological Research LLC, Tomsk, St. Elizarovs 79/4, Russian Federation.
2Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk, Moskovsky Trakt, 2, Russian Federation.
3Goldberg Research Institute of Pharmacology and Regenerative Medicine, Tomsk, St. Lenin 3, Russian Federation.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 15,      Issue - 3,     Year - 2022


ABSTRACT:
The goal of the present study: assess the distribution and transmembrane transport of an antiaggregant drug GRS of indolinone series. The distribution of an indolinone derivative in organs, between blood plasma and blood cells was studied in Sprague Dawley rats. A Thermo Scientific Pierce dialysis system was used to study the binding to blood plasma proteins. A MultiScreen Caco-2 test system was used to study the transmembrane transfer of the indolinone derivative. Quantitative assay of GRS was performed by an HPLC/?S method. GRS was shown to pass into the liver, heart and kidneys, and doesn’t pass into the brain and skeletal muscle. The highest GRS accumulation occurs in the liver, the lowest in the kidneys. GRS has low plasma protein binding and its concentration is 1.6 times higher in blood cells than in blood plasma. GRS in 1 mcmol concentration has low cell membrane permeability from apical to basolateral membrane (A-B), increasing the concentration gradient by 10 times leads to a corresponding increase in transport efficiency. In the reverse direction (B-A) GRS permeability is 8.8 times higher, showing its participation in active transport. Pgp inhibitor cyclosporin A considerably decreases the transport efficiency of GRS in B-A direction.


Cite this article:
Bykov Vladimir Valer’evich, Bykova Arina Vladimirovna, Leonov Klim Andreevich, Vengerovskii Alexander Isaakovich, Udut Vladimir Vasil’evich. Distribution and Transmembrane transport as the basis of proper Pharmacodynamics of an Antithrombotic drug – An Indolinone derivative. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2022; 15(3):1241-4. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00207

Cite(Electronic):
Bykov Vladimir Valer’evich, Bykova Arina Vladimirovna, Leonov Klim Andreevich, Vengerovskii Alexander Isaakovich, Udut Vladimir Vasil’evich. Distribution and Transmembrane transport as the basis of proper Pharmacodynamics of an Antithrombotic drug – An Indolinone derivative. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2022; 15(3):1241-4. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00207   Available on: https://rjptonline.org/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2022-15-3-50


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