Author(s): Supriya Chatla, Devalarao. Garikapati, Abdul Rahaman, Iswarya Obilineni

Email(s): snsanjurocks@gmail.com

DOI: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00204   

Address: Supriya Chatla1*, Devalarao. Garikapati2, Abdul Rahaman3, Iswarya Obilineni4
1Associate Professor, Department of Biotechnology, Nirmala College of Pharmacy, Atmakuru, Mangalagiri, Guntur.
2Principal, KVSR Siddhartha College of Pharmaceutical Sciences Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh.
3Principal, Nirmala College of Pharmacy, Atmakur, Andhra Pradesh.
4Assistant Professor, KVSR Siddhartha College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 15,      Issue - 3,     Year - 2022


ABSTRACT:
Microbial enzymes are widely used in different pharmaceutical, textile and in leather industries, mainly because of vast availability of sources. They could be genetically modified and are considered as more economical in comparison to plant and animal enzymes. Production of microbial enzymes by application of fermentation involves microbial propagation like bacteria, mold and yeast to get useful product. There are two methods of fermentation used to produce microbial enzymes called submerged fermentation and solid-state fermentation. Submerged fermentation involves the production of enzymes by using microorganisms in a liquid state nutrient media. Solid-state fermentation is the cultivation of microorganisms in solid substrate. Nutrients containing carbon compounds are broken down by the microorganisms, which produce the enzymes either intracellular or extracellular. Industries that use enzymes generated by fermentation are the brewing, wine making, baking, cheese making, dairy, beverages, and cereals. In the present study Asperigillus Niger strain was used to produce the extra cellular naringinase enzyme in nutrient medium containing Amla as a solid substrate. Amla is the chief material for the production maximum Naringinase enzyme. The study also involved in the optimization of various physical parameters like temperature, PH, incubation period, mass of inoculum. The study concluded that pH -5.5, temperature of 28oc, incubation period of 96 hrs and 20% of inoculums for maximum naringinase production.


Cite this article:
Supriya Chatla, Devalarao. Garikapati, Abdul Rahaman, Iswarya Obilineni. Production of Naringinase by using Amla on Solid State Fermentation. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2022; 15(3):1225-9. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00204

Cite(Electronic):
Supriya Chatla, Devalarao. Garikapati, Abdul Rahaman, Iswarya Obilineni. Production of Naringinase by using Amla on Solid State Fermentation. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2022; 15(3):1225-9. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00204   Available on: https://rjptonline.org/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2022-15-3-47


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