Author(s): Adithya D. Shetty, Sandeep S. Shenoy, D. Sreedhar, Ankitha Shetty, Rohini Rao, Komal Jenifer D’souza

Email(s): sandeep.shenoy@manipal.edu

DOI: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00152   

Address: Adithya D. Shetty1, Sandeep S. Shenoy1*, D. Sreedhar2, Ankitha Shetty1, Rohini Rao3, Komal Jenifer D’souza1
1Department of Commerce, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal – 576104 Dist - Udupi (Karnataka) India.
2Department of Pharmacy Management, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal - 576104 Dist - Udupi (Karnataka) India.
3Department of Data Science and Computer Applications, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal – 576104 Dist - Udupi (Karnataka) India.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 15,      Issue - 2,     Year - 2022


ABSTRACT:
Effectively managing the pharma supply chain is crucial in order to ensure optimal safety of drugs. Various issues pertained to pharma logistics is evident namely shortage of medicines, fake medicines, vulnerabilities in security, etc., highlights the failures in pharma supply chain and the high stakes involved in this sector in comparison to any other sector. The study incorporates the guidelines of PRISMA in order to synthesize the literature. This paper makes an honest attempt to discuss the glitches in the pharma supply chain due to faulty systems in place. It further deliberates on the need for the implementation of blockchain so as to enable a fool-proof track and trace system which goes on to avoid the occurrence of counterfeit drugs in the supply chain. This perspective highlights the opportunities that blockchain has, in the area of pharma supply chain and how vital it is for future adoption and implementation.


Cite this article:
Adithya D. Shetty, Sandeep S. Shenoy, D. Sreedhar, Ankitha Shetty, Rohini Rao, Komal Jenifer D’souza. Traceability of counterfeit drugs in pharma supply chain through Blockchain Technology - A Systematic Review of the Evidence. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2022; 15(2):908-2. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00152

Cite(Electronic):
Adithya D. Shetty, Sandeep S. Shenoy, D. Sreedhar, Ankitha Shetty, Rohini Rao, Komal Jenifer D’souza. Traceability of counterfeit drugs in pharma supply chain through Blockchain Technology - A Systematic Review of the Evidence. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2022; 15(2):908-2. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00152   Available on: https://rjptonline.org/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2022-15-2-72


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