Author(s): Pragya Chaturvedi, Vijay Laxmi Saxena, Vishakha Raina, Pooran Singh Solanki, Abhishek Chaturvedi

Email(s): biochem.abhishek@gmail.com

DOI: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00820   

Address: Pragya Chaturvedi1,2,3, Vijay Laxmi Saxena3, Vishakha Raina1, Pooran Singh Solanki2, Abhishek Chaturvedi4*
1School of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneshwar
Odisha, India.
2Birla Institute of Scientific Research, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India.
3Bioinformatics Infrastructure Facility Centre
D. G. P. G. College, Kanpur, U.P, India.
4Melaka Manipal Medical College (Manipal Campus), Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India-576104.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 15,      Issue - 11,     Year - 2022


ABSTRACT:
Indian culinary spices are used for their medicinal properties since ancient times and play an important role even in today’s traditional medicine systems. The pharmaceutical value of spices is being established through various studies and patents. The antiviral activities of spices are well known. Influenza is a seasonal problem and also a pandemic infection. In the current scenario, there is a need to explore new targets as well as new drugs to combat influenza infection. This study aimed to identify the antiviral activity of spices against influenza targets using the bioinformatics approach. The study predicted the efficiency of curcumin derivatives in targeting multiple influenza targets, which can be further used in anti-influenza treatment.


Cite this article:
Pragya Chaturvedi, Vijay Laxmi Saxena, Vishakha Raina, Pooran Singh Solanki, Abhishek Chaturvedi. Can Spices Cure Flu?: A Multiple targets based Bioinformatics analysis. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2022; 15(11):4881-6. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00820

Cite(Electronic):
Pragya Chaturvedi, Vijay Laxmi Saxena, Vishakha Raina, Pooran Singh Solanki, Abhishek Chaturvedi. Can Spices Cure Flu?: A Multiple targets based Bioinformatics analysis. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2022; 15(11):4881-6. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2022.00820   Available on: https://rjptonline.org/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2022-15-11-5


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