Author(s): T. Praveen Kumar, P. Prashanthi, Shaik Sabiya, M. Chinna Eswaraiah

Email(s): thirunagarii.praveen@gmail.com

DOI: 10.52711/0974-360X.2021.00767   

Address: T. Praveen Kumar1*, P. Prashanthi2, Shaik Sabiya2, M. Chinna Eswaraiah3
1Department of Pharmaceutics, Anurag Pharmacy College, Kodad (M), Suryapet (D), Telangana State. 508206, India.
2Department of Pharm D, Anurag Pharmacy College, Kodad (M), Suryapet (D), Telangana State. 508206, India.
3Department of Pharmacognosy, Anurag Pharmacy College, Kodad (M), Suryapet (D), Telangana State. 508206, India.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 14,      Issue - 8,     Year - 2021


ABSTRACT:
Congestive heart disease (CHD) is considered to be the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in both gender groups in developed and developing countries. Hypertension is one of the main mortality risks and is attributed to over 45% of all deaths from CHD. The main objective of our work was to evaluate cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients attending a tertiary care hospital in the Khammam region. The study was a prospective observational study conducted over an 8-month period from June 2019 to January 2020. 192 subjects were selected based on the inclusion criteria. CVD risk was assessed using Q Risk 3 software and the results were presented as CVD risk and relative risk. The same number of men and women (96) was selected in the study to evaluate the influence of gender on CVD risk. Other risk factors such as BMI, marital status, literacy rate, occupation, physical activity and lifestyle were assessed to determine CVD risk. Abnormal HTN values were found in 66 men and 63 women. Age progression was found to be an important factor in CVD risk in both men and women. Social status and literacy rates in patients over 50 have also been found to cause CVD risk. Our study showed that physical inactivity, eating habits, obesity, smoking, alcohol and hypertension had a direct effect on cardiovascular risk.


Cite this article:
T. Praveen Kumar, P. Prashanthi, Shaik Sabiya, M. Chinna Eswaraiah. Cardiovascular Risk Assessment in Hypertensive patients: A Perspective Observative Study. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2021; 14(8):4420-4. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2021.00767

Cite(Electronic):
T. Praveen Kumar, P. Prashanthi, Shaik Sabiya, M. Chinna Eswaraiah. Cardiovascular Risk Assessment in Hypertensive patients: A Perspective Observative Study. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2021; 14(8):4420-4. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2021.00767   Available on: https://rjptonline.org/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2021-14-8-73


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