Author(s): Jayamathi Govindaraj, Keerthidaa Govindaraj, S. Raghavendra Jayesh, Kesavaram Padmavathy, Mathangi Ramalingam, Vidyarekha U.

Email(s): gjayamathe@gmail.com , keerthidaagovindaraj@gmail.com

DOI: 10.52711/0974-360X.2021.00739   

Address: Jayamathi Govindaraj1*, Keerthidaa Govindaraj2, S. Raghavendra Jayesh3, Kesavaram Padmavathy4, Mathangi Ramalingam5, Vidyarekha U.6
1Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital, Bharath Institute of Higher Education and Research, Pallikaranai, Chennai, 600100, India.
2MDS Department of Periodontics, Thai Mookambihai Dental College and Hospital, MGR University, Maduravoyal, Chennai, India.
3Professor, Department of Prosthodontics, Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital, Bharath Institute of Higher Education and Research, (BIHER) Pallikaranai, Chennai, 600100, India.
4Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology, Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital, Bharath Institute of Higher Education and Research, Pallikaranai, Chennai, 600100, India.
5Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital, Bharath Institute of Higher Education and Research, (BIHER) Pallikaranai, Chennai, 600100, India.
6Senior Lecturer in

Published In:   Volume - 14,      Issue - 8,     Year - 2021


ABSTRACT:
Obesity is defined as an excessive growth of adipose tissue. It is associated with over nutrition, which impairs systemic metabolic homeostasis. Adipokines secreted by adipose tissue could play an vital role in the development of obesity and associated metabolic disorders includes insulin resistance, inflammation, hypertension, cardiovascular risk etc. Adipokines will be of importance in the development of novel therapies for obesity-associated diseases. This review emphasises on obesity and the role of some Adipokines in obesity and related metabolic disorders.


Cite this article:
Jayamathi Govindaraj, Keerthidaa Govindaraj, S. Raghavendra Jayesh, Kesavaram Padmavathy, Mathangi Ramalingam, Vidyarekha U. Role of Adipokines in Obesity and Obesity related Metabolic Disorders. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2021; 14(8):4261-4. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2021.00739

Cite(Electronic):
Jayamathi Govindaraj, Keerthidaa Govindaraj, S. Raghavendra Jayesh, Kesavaram Padmavathy, Mathangi Ramalingam, Vidyarekha U. Role of Adipokines in Obesity and Obesity related Metabolic Disorders. Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology. 2021; 14(8):4261-4. doi: 10.52711/0974-360X.2021.00739   Available on: https://rjptonline.org/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2021-14-8-45


REFERENCES:
1.    Reaven G, Abbasi F, Mc. Laughlin T. Obesity, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Recent Prog Horm Res. 2004; 59: 207-23.
2.    Xu H, Barnes G.T, Yang, Q, Tan G, Yang D, Chou C.J, Sole J. Nichols A, Ross JS, Tartaglia LA. et al. Chronic inflammation in fat plays a crucial role in the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. J. Clin. Investig. 2003; 112: 1821-1830.
3.    Kershaw EE, Flier JS. Adipose tissue as an endocrine organ. J Clin Endocrinol. 2004; 89: 2548-56.
4.    Aldhahi W and Hamdy O. Adipokines, inflammation, and the endothelium in diabetes. Current Diabetes Reports. 2003; 3(4): 293-298.
5.    Fain JN, Madan AK, Hiler ML, Cheema P, Bahouth SW. Comparison of the release of adipokines by adipose tissue, adipose tissue matrix, and adipocytes from visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues of obese humans. Endocrinology. 2004; 14: 52273-82.
6.    Saltiel AR., Kahn CR. Insulin signalling and the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. Nature. 2001; 414: 799-806.
7.    Petersen KF, Shulman GI. Etiology of insulin resistance. Am. J. Med. 2006; 119(Suppl. 1): S10–S16.
8.    Chawla A, Nguyen KD, and Goh YPS. Macrophage-mediated inflammation in metabolic disease. Nature Reviews Immunology 2011; 11(11): 738-749
9.    Gil A, Aguilera CM, Gil-Campos M, and Cañete R. Altered signalling and gene expression associated with the immune system and the inflammatory response in obesity, British Journal of Nutrition. 2007; 98(1): S121-S126.
10.    Fain, J.N. Release of inflammatory mediators by human adipose tissue is enhanced in obesity and primarily by the nonfat cells: A review. Mediat. Inflamm. 2010; 2010: 513948.
11.    Tan X, Wang X, Chu H, Liu H, Yi X, Xiao Y. SFRP5 correlates with obesity and metabolic syndrome and increases after weight loss in children. Clin. Endocrinol. (Oxf) 2014; 81(3): 363-9.
12.    Bourlier V, Zakaroff-Girard A, Miranville A et al., “Remodeling phenotype of human subcutaneous adipose tissue macrophages,” Circulation 2008; 117(6): 806-815
13.    Houstis N, Rosen ED, and Lander ES, “Reactive oxygen species have a causal role in multiple forms of insulin resistance” Nature 2006; 440(7086): 944-948.
14.    Lago F, Dieguez C, Gómez-Reino J, and Gualillo O, “Adipokines as emerging mediators of immune response and inflammation,” Nature Clinical Practice Rheumatology 2007; 3(12): 716-724.
15.    Wang ZV and Scherer PE, “Adiponectin, cardiovascular function, and hypertension,” Hypertension 2008; (51)1 : 8-14.
16.    Engeli S, Schling P, Gorzelniak K et al., “The adipose-tissue renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system: role in the metabolic syndrome?” International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, 2003; 35(6): 807-825.
17.    Atluri P, Morine KJ, Liao GP et al, “Ischemic heart failure enhances endogenous myocardial apelin and APJ receptor expression,” Cellular and Molecular Biology Letters 2007; 12(1): 127-138.
18.    Bobbert T, Rochlitz H, Wegewitz U et al., “Changes of adiponectin oligomer composition by moderate weight reduction,” Diabetes 2005; 54(9): 2712-2719.

Recomonded Articles:

Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology (RJPT) is an international, peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary journal.... Read more >>>

RNI: CHHENG00387/33/1/2008-TC                     
DOI: 10.5958/0974-360X 

0.38
2018CiteScore
 
56th percentile
Powered by  Scopus


SCImago Journal & Country Rank


Recent Articles




Tags


Not Available