Author(s): R.N. Regitha, V. Parthasarathy, N. Balakrishnan

Email(s): jvchrsty@yahoo.co.in

DOI: 10.5958/0974-360X.2021.00201.8   

Address: R.N. Regitha1*, V. Parthasarathy2, N. Balakrishnan3
1Department of Pharmacology, S.A. Raja Pharmacy College, Vadakangulam, Thirunelveli 2Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Annamalai University, Chidambaram.
3Department of Pharmacognosy, S.A.Raja Pharmacy College, Vadakangulam, Thirunelveli, Tamilnadu, India.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 14,      Issue - 2,     Year - 2021


ABSTRACT:
Brassica nigra, the black mustard, is an annual plant cultivated for its black or dark brown seeds, which are the members of Brassica genus (Family: Brassicaceae). It is an annual weedy plant which has immense edible as well as medicinal value. Brassica nigra consist of thirty-seven different species. Brassica vegetables contain low fat, high vitamin, mineral and fibre as well as various phytochemicals. It prevents oxidative stress, induce detoxification enzymes, stimulate the immune system, reduce cancer risk, and inhibit malign transformation and carcinogenic mutations in addition to reduce the proliferation of cancer cells. Globally cancer is a disease which severely effects the human population. There is a constant demand for new therapies to treat and prevent this life-threatening disease. Scientific and research interest is sketch its attention towards naturally-derived compounds as they are considered to have less toxic side effects compared to current treatments such as chemotherapy. The present study explores the anti- cancer activities of Brassica nigra plant comprising various chemical constituents and is necessitated by the current interest in plant products as a cheaper and far better alternative than the synthetic drugs available. This current review will bring concise information about the known mechanism of action and cancer activities of Brassica nigra.


Cite this article:
R.N. Regitha, V. Parthasarathy, N. Balakrishnan. Cancer Protective effect of Brassicca nigra and Role of its Chemical Constituents . Research J. Pharm. and Tech. 2021; 14(2):1115-1121. doi: 10.5958/0974-360X.2021.00201.8


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