Author(s): Alfred Maroyi

Email(s): amaroyi@ufh.ac.za

DOI: 10.5958/0974-360X.2020.00967.1   

Address: Alfred Maroyi
Department of Botany, University of Fort Hare, Private Bag X1314, Alice 5700, South Africa.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 13,      Issue - 11,     Year - 2020


ABSTRACT:
Hilliardiella elaeagnoides is a herbaceous plant species used as traditional medicine in southern Africa. The current investigation is aimed at reviewing the phytochemistry, pharmacological properties and medicinal uses of H. elaeagnoides. Results of the current study are based on literature search on phytochemistry, pharmacological properties and medicinal uses of H. elaeagnoides using several internet sources such as Scopus, Elsevier, SciFinder, Google Scholar, Pubmed, Science Direct and Web of Science. Other sources of information included pre-electronic sources such as journal articles, theses, book chapters, books and other scientific publications obtained from the University library. The current study showed that H. elaeagnoides is used as appetite stimulant, colic, protective charm and purgative, and traditional medicine for wounds, malaria, ulcerative colitis, dysentery, malaise, diarrhoea, stomach problems, constipation, rheumatism and abdominal pains. Ethnopharmacological research identified tannins, sesquiterpene lactones, steroids, alkaloids, amino acids, glycosides, flavonoids, polyphenols, saponins and triterpenoids from the aerial parts, leaves, roots, stems and whole plant parts of H. elaeagnoides. The leaf and root extracts of the species and compounds identified from H. elaeagnoides exhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), antibacterial, antiplasmodial, antidiabetic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiprotozoal, antiulcer, cytotoxicity and bitterness activities. The crude extracts and compounds isolated from the species should be evaluated for detailed pharmacological and toxicological studies aimed at correlating the medicinal applications with ethnopharmacological properties of the species.


Cite this article:
Alfred Maroyi. Hilliardiella elaeagnoides: Review of its Medicinal uses, Phytochemistry and Pharmacological properties. Research J. Pharm. and Tech. 2020; 13(11):5539-5545. doi: 10.5958/0974-360X.2020.00967.1


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