Indigenous Medicine used for Treatment of Diabetes in Gwalior Chambal Region of Madhya Pradesh

 

Goyal Rupendra Kumar*, Jain Suman, Dahima Rashmi

SOS in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jiwaji University, Gwalior (M.P.) India

*Corresponding Author E-mail: goyalrk09@gmail.com

 

 

ABSTRACT:

Diabetes mellitus is a major problem of today’s world and leading cause of death. Indians are genetically more susceptible to diabetes, for which world health organization predicts the number of diabetic persons in India may rise up to 74 million by 2025. The increasing worldwide incidence of diabetes mellitus in adults constitutes a global public health burden. It is predicted that by 2030, India, china and the United States will have largest number of people with diabetes. So the need arises to cure this disease with potent drug causing fewer side effects.

 

The plant based medicinal system is very useful since a long time for treatment of diabetes. It is necessary to emphasize plant based study because allopathic system has more side effects; however they are potent antidiabetic agents. Many of the herbs are available having antidiabetic activity and shows their action by different mechanism like stimulating or regenerating the effect on β cell or extra pancreatic effect for hypoglycemic activity. The 60% of the patient uses traditional system of medicine in India for treatment of diabetes. Since ancient times, plants have been an exemplary source of medicine. Ayurveda and other Indian literature mention the use of plants in treatment of various human ailments. India has about 45000 plant species and among them, several thousands have been claimed to possess medicinal properties. Research conducted in last few decades on plants mentioned in ancient literature or used traditionally for diabetes has shown anti-diabetic property.

 

The herbal drugs with antidiabetic activity are yet to be commercially formulated as modern medicines, even though they have been acclaimed for their therapeutic properties in the traditional systems of medicine.

 

KEYWORDS: Antidiabetic, Traditional Medicines, Diabetes

 


INTRODUCTION:

India is a varietal emporium of medicinal plants and is one of the richest countries in the world as regards genetic resources of medicinal plants. According to estimates, large population of the world about 70 and 80% depends on traditional medicines to meet their demands. They rely on medicinal plants because of their effectiveness, lack of modern healthcare alternatives and cultural preferences1.

 

The relationship between plants and human cultures is not limited to the use of plants for food, clothing, religious ceremonies, ornamental and shelter but also includes their use for health care. It was officially recognized that 2500 plant species have medicinal value while over 6000 plants are estimated to be explored in traditional, folk and herbal medicine.

 

It is necessary that we should have full knowledge regarding the occurrence, frequency, distribution and phenology of various plants for their proper utilization. Traditionally, the rural population prefers plant medicines for treatment of Diabetes.

 

An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used in the treatment of Diabetes was carried out among the rural people in Gwalior- Chambal region of Madhya Pradesh, India. Its rural people and tribals living in remote/ Forest areas while most rural population lives nearby the great river of Chambal that is also known as Ravines (Hindi- Biharh), the people lives in these areas are still depend to a great extent on the indigenous system of medicine. A wide range of plants with ethnomedicinal value against some very important diseases have been reported but much larger numbers of folk medicines have remained endemic to certain tribal/rural pockets. Various works have been undertaken to document different types of medicinal plants used by various ethnic groups in all over India2-5 and also in North East India6-11 to mention a few.

 

The popularity of traditional medicines has grown enormously during the recent years. The domestic demand for traditional medicines in India has increased. The market of traditional system of medicine in India is estimated to be about Indian rupees 4000 crores per year12-14.

 

The present study was done at various parts of Gwalior Chambal region of Madhya Pradesh, India. The Gwalior Chambal region is located in the north region of Madhya Pradesh. Chambal region occupied three districts mainly Bhind, Morena, Sheopur. The entire region is occupied an area of about 21277 sq kilometer. The temperature varies from 470 C to 70 C and the annual rainfall is about 380 mm. The most data were collected from rural areas of Gwalior Chambal region of Madhya Pradesh. The present paper concentrates on the traditional or Herbal medicines used by the rural population for diabetic conditions.

 

MATERIAL AND METHODOLOGY:             

The present paper is outcome of extensive study of different villages of Gwalior Chambal region of Madhya Pradesh. During study work the knowledge were collected from local knowledgeable Villagers, Herbal healers called Vaidyaraj, old Women and Patients etc. The Antidiabetic (Hypoglycaemic) value of each plant was enumerated in the following patterns:- Local name, Botanical name, Family, Part(s) used and Disease (Probable mechanism). The enumeration of the medicinal Plants with Antidiabetic activity are described in following Table-1.

 


 

Table No.1: Plants used for Diabetic disorders in Gwalior Chambal region of Madhyapradesh

Sr No.

Botanical Name

Family

Local Name

Part Used

Therapeutic Action

1.

Cuminum Nigrum L.

Compositae

Kali Jeeri/ Shah Jeera

Fruits

Significant Blood Glucose Lowering

2.

Vinca Rosea L.

 Apocynaceae

Sadabahar

Leaves                                            

Lowering Of Glycaemia

3.

Aloe Vera

Liliaceae

Ghritkumari/ Gwarpatha

Latex

Lower Blood Glucose Levels

4.

Cocos Nucifera L.

Arecaceae                                                

Coconut

Fibres

Hypoglycaemic Effect

5.

Coccinia Indica

Cucurbitaceae

Kundru/ Parmal

Root

Hypoglycaemic

6.

Bombax Ceiba                                              

Malvaceae

Semal

Plant Latex

Reduction In Glycaemia

7.

Ficus Bengalensis L

Moraceae

Bargad/ Vad

Water Extract Of Bark

Hypoglycaemic

8.

Gymnema Sylvestre

Asclepiadaceae

Gurmar 

Leave

Regulate Sugar Metabolism

9.

Momordica Charantia L.

Cucurbitaceae

Karela

Fruit & Leaves

Hypoglycaemic

10.

Ocimum Sanctum

Lamiaceae

Tulsi

Aerial Parts

Diabetes Mallitus

11.

Pterocarpus Marsupium

Fabaceae

Bija

Aquous Infusion Of Wood

Diabetes

12.

Swertia Chirayita

Gentianaceae

Chirayita

Aerial Parts

Blood Sugar Lowering Effect 

13.

Syzigium Cumini

Myrtaceae

Jamun

 Leaves

Antihyperglycemic Effect

14.

Tinospora Cordifolia

Menispermaceae

Giloe

Stem

Diabetes

15.

Trigonella Foenum Graecum

Fabaceae

Methi

Seeds

Controlling High Blood Sugar

16.

Asteracantha Longifolia Nees

Acanthaceae 

Chulli

Whole Plant Parts

Significantly Improve Glucose Tolerance

17.

Achyranthes Aspera L

Amaranthaceae

Chirchita, Latjira

Leaves

Decrease Blood Sugar Level

18.

Mangifera Indica L

Anacardiaceae

Mango

Leaves

Reduction In The Intestinal Absorption Of Glucose

19.

Daucus Carota L

Apiaceae

Carrot

Leaves

Improve The Glucose Tolerance

20.

Coriandrum Sativum L

Umbelliferae

Coriander

Seeds

Reduce Hyperglycaemia

21.

Cuminum Cyminum L

Umbellifereae

Zeera

Aerial Parts

Antihyperglycaemic

22.

Allium Cepa

Liliaceae

Onion (Pyaj)

Bulb

Antidiabetic

23.

Allium Sativum

Liliaceae

Garlic (Lahsun)

Bulb

Antidiabetic

24.

Cajanus Cajan

Fabaceae

Arahara (Arhar)

Seeds

Hypoglycaemic

25.

 Caesalpinia Bonducella

Caesalpiniaceae

Karanj

Seeds

Antidiabetic

26.

Terminalia Chebula

Combretaceae

Harra

Fruit

Antibiabetic


RESULTS AND DISCUSSION:

The data on medicinal plants for treatment of Diabetic disorders were collected from local People of Gwalior Chambal region of Madhya Pradesh, were analyzed.

 

The use of Plant species as Medicine is as ancient as men himself. The medicinal preparations are practiced in day to day life of tribal and Villagers living far away from cities. Some time it was also seen that this preparation of Ethnomedicines were believed by the patient who were taking allopathic medicines, this type of practice may make strong moral support for traditional Herbal healers and there are the continuous need to do research on herbals to pick up of active ingredients from ethnomedicines.

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT:

The authors are greatly thankful to all the herbal healers such as Vaidhraj, old peoples, Patients and all those personals who has directly or indirectly support this study. The author would also like the special thanks to the staff members of SOS In Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jiwaji University, Gwalior for their sincere cooperation.

 

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Received on 29.04.2013       Modified on 11.05.2013

Accepted on 14.05.2013      © RJPT All right reserved

Research J. Pharm. and Tech. 6(5): May 2013; Page 589-591